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New thoughts on exercise and MS

Blog Summary

Ok, we all know that we should be exercising. Besides all of the great stuff that exercise does for everyone (lowered cardiovascular risk, increased muscle mass, etc.), research on the effects of exercise in MS has shown that it: Lowers risk for depression Improves MS-related fatigue Improves cognitive functioning Notably, exercise has also been shown to increase overall daily activity level, functional capacity and balance in people with MS as well. Overall, this adds up to a measurable increase in quality of life. There is even limited evidence in animal models that exercise therapy may halt, slow or reverse disease progression of MS.

ECTRIMS: Risks and Triggers for MS

Blog Summary

There’s a lot of progress being reported this week at ECTRIMS on the topic of MS risk factors and triggers. I think this is really important because if we knew exactly what causes MS, we might be able to prevent anyone from ever getting the disease again. But even more relevant to people who already live with MS is new evidence for risk factors that are within a person’s control and which may make their disease worse – or better.   For example, in a large population study by Dr. A.K. Hedström and team from Stockholm, Sweden, they confirmed that cigarette smoking increased the risk for developing MS at any age, and climbed with the amount smoked. They also found that quitting smoking completely flattened out that risk back to normal within a decade. 

Tuning in to others

Blog Summary

I hate to sound like a broken record, but I can’t emphasize how important yoga has been to me over the past few years. Not only has yoga helped me manage my multiple sclerosis, it has calmed my mind, nurtured my spirit, brought new and wonderful friends into my life, and made me physically stronger and more flexible. It has also made me more empathetic; I am much more tuned in to other people than I was before I started practicing. Nowadays I teach a couple of yoga classes each week at the small studio a few miles down the road. Before each class I ask my students whether there’s anything going on in their bodies, any injuries, weaknesses, or tight spots I should be aware of.

Taking a Day Off

Blog Summary

As I have noted a number of times in this blog, I try to maintain a healthful diet and exercise regularly. I’m convinced that doing so helps me manage my multiple sclerosis, and it just makes me feel better overall. But I do tend to be obsessive about such things. For many years, I was convinced that the whole scheme would crumble if I missed a day at the gym or overindulged on a not-so-healthful food item. I was one of those people whose day revolved around her workout schedule; by extension, that meant my family’s schedules did, too.

Fear: Confronting the enemy

Blog Summary

I want to pick up where Trevis left off – talking about how he and his wife confronted fears about the future and advanced MS by getting to know more about the “enemy". Fear of the disease can be disabling, sometimes more than the disease itself. Fear can literally stop people in their tracks. So the best strategy is often to think about what frightens you the most (which will be different for every individual) – whether it’s reduced mobility, loss of employment, threats to your independence, a shortened life expectancy, or anything else – and work proactively to help yourself feel less vulnerable, safer, healthier, and more in control. The next step is to get educated about the issue or issues that scare you and take steps to build your safety net. And if you’re not sure how to go about that, an MS Navigator can guide you.

Five Reasons why I love the Farmer’s Market

Blog Summary

One of the many, many things I love about summertime is my tiny Connecticut town’s weekly farmer’s market. Run by a dedicated group of volunteers, this charming little enterprise is one of the highlights of my week. Why? Well, I’ll give you five reasons:Everyone in town is there. The East Granby farmer’s market is as much about bumping into friends and neighbors as it is about buying local produce. It’s great to get outside and mingle with folks on a sunny summer afternoon. The market is held in a nice, big, flat parking lot, too, so people in wheelchairs and parents pushing strollers can get around easily.

In the Swim

Blog Summary

As I have written before, I am one of the rare people with multiple sclerosis who love, and thrive in, hot weather. I haven’t always liked the heat, though; I grew up just outside Washington, D.C., where the air was thick and soupy for much of the summer. Let me tell you, I was grateful when my parents finally installed central air conditioning in our house! Nowadays I live in Connecticut, where it’s generally – though not always – a bit cooler and less humid than in the D.C. area. Still, we have our share of blazing hot days. Oddly, I attribute my ability to enjoy those sizzlers to the fact that our house is NOT air-conditioned. We rely on open windows and lots of fans (including one in the attic) to stay cool. Because I work at home, I don’t have to make the transition between an air-conditioned office and a non-air-conditioned home the way my poor husband and daughter do. I don’t even turn the air on in my car! So I think my body has become acclimated to the heat.

Exercise & MS: An interview with Dr. Albert Lo

Blog Summary

Following our June 11 webcast, Living Well with MS: Lifestyle, Diet and Complementary Therapies, we sat down with Dr. Albert Lo to get answers to your questions about exercise and MS. Here is the first half of our interview with Dr. Lo. Are there any specific workouts, keeping one's personal limits in mind, that are recommended? First of all, I just want to be transparent that I’m approaching this subject as a physician and neurologist who is involved in translational clinical research. I’m not an exercise physiologist, physiatrist or physical therapist, and therefore don’t have their specialized training or perspective.

Diet & MS: An interview with Dr. Allen Bowling

Blog Summary

Following our June 11 webcast, Living Well with MS: Lifestyle, Diet and Complementary Therapies, we sat down with Dr. Allen Bowling to get answers to your most popular questions about diet and MS.I hear about all these different diets for people with MS. How do I know which one I should follow? There’s a quotation that I love by nutrition writer, Michael Pollan – I think about it personally every day and share it with my patients as well. He summarized thousands of pages of writing with these seven words: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."

Vitamins & Supplements: An interview with Dr. Brenda Banwell

Blog Summary

Following last week’s webcast, Living Well with MS: Lifestyle, Diet and Complementary Therapies, we sat down with Dr. Brenda Banwell, MD, to get answers to your questions about vitamins and supplements that are potentially helpful and harmful for people with MS.In addition to Vitamin D, what other vitamins or supplements do you recommend taking on a daily basis to help MS? There really isn’t anything else that’s even close to vitamin D in terms of research support for its use in MS. However, I do a blood test of the serum levels of vitamin B12 to make sure my patients aren’t deficient. Vitamin B12 deficiency has a negative impact on myelin, which is important for neurological function and is a particular target in MS. In fact, B12 deficiency can actually look like MS in some patients, and having low B12 if you have MS can further compromise the brain and spine. That said, healthy people who are eating a regular diet are rarely deficient in B12, and if you have normal levels, taking additional B12 has no proven value. People who are on some extreme diets or don’t eat red meat are more likely to have low levels and should be treated if that’s the case.

Vitamin D & MS: An interview with Dr. Brenda Banwell

Blog Summary

During last week’s webcast, Living Well with MS: Lifestyle, Diet and Complementary Therapies, we received a number of questions about vitamin D. We sat down with Dr. Brenda Banwell, MD, following the webcast to get answers to some of the most popular questions you submitted.How much vitamin D should a person with MS be taking? The graph below shows the current recommendations, for the general population, according to the Canadian Food Guide. If you are living with MS, I would recommend that you work with your healthcare provider to obtain your Vitamin D blood levels (also called a 25-hydroxy Vitamin D), which is a measurement of the circulating Vitamin D in the body. Vitamin D levels should be around 75 nanomals per liter (Canada) or between 40-80 nanograms per milliliter (United States).